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RETIRED STATE, COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION OF MASSACHUSETTS
TM
IMUNICIPAL RETIREE INSURANCE MORATORIUM EXPIRES JUNE 30TH
OF THE RETIRED PUBLIC EMPLOYEE
11 BEACON STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108-3030 | (617) 723-7283 | WWW.MASSRETIREES.COM JULY 2018
n 2011, Mass Retirees was Fight Continues For further unfair cost shifting. successful in helping to Permanent Protection Existing retirees cannot afford pass a temporary morato- to pay more in out-of-pocket
rium that prevented cities and costs, along with higher and
towns from
retirees’ health insurance premium contribution percentages. That pro- tection, which has now been extended twice, expires on June 30th.
higher monthly premiums.” During the budget debate in the Senate, State Senator Cindy Fried- man (D-Arlington) echoed Mass Retirees sentiments from the Senate floor. Friedman sponsored the pro- posal to permanently grandfather existing retirees under current con- tribution percentage rates – a policy adopted by the Commonwealth for
Association officials, along with the Mass. Teachers Association, PFFM and other public employee unions, have advocated for a per- manent change in the municipal health insurance law that would prohibit increases in premium con- tribution percentages for existing retirees. However, changes could be made to the percentages paid by future retirees.
As it has done in the past, the MMA mischaracterized the pro- posal as a budget buster to cities and towns, that would create unrea- sonable hurdles for local officials trying to control costs.
state retirees since 1994.
“We’re getting to a point where
Attempts to include the proposal as an amendment to the FY19 State Budget fell short in both the House
Rep. Mike Day (D-Stoneham) carried the same amendment in the House. Day, whose district includes
increasing
and Senate. Despite the best efforts of key legislators, the amendments were strongly opposed by some local officials and the Mass. Munic- ipal Association (MMA).
“The tactics used by the MMA are not new. They fought the original moratorium, as well as opposed each extension over the past seven years,” said Association Legislative Director Shawn Duhamel. “Our proposal does not add one penny to municipal budgets. What it does do is protect existing retirees from
people absolutely cannot afford going to the doctor. They’re choos- ing between food, rent and staying healthy”, said Friedman.
Please See Page 6 ☞ WEP REFORM WORK CONTINUES
Neal & Brady Push Bipartisan Effort
When gauging fall Elimination Provi- whether or not sion (WEP) from a
legislation may have a chance of advancing through Congress or the State Legislature, a tell- tale sign is the level of staff activity happening behind the scenes.
widespread network of organizations advocat- ing for reform. Most importantly, the work was not limited to WEP reform advocates.
This spring brought a distinct uptick in activ- ity surrounding the pro- posal to reform the Social Security Wind-
Following instruc- tions from their respec- tive bosses, the staffs of House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady
Please See Page 2 ☞
MASS RETIREES MEETS WITH CONGRESSMAN RICHIE NEAL IN SPRINGFIELD
L-R: Rep. Richie Neal, Pres. Frank Valeri, Leg. Dir. Shawn Duhamel, Counsel Bill Rehrey, Soc. Sec. Consultant Tom Lussier


































































































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