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SENATE APPROvES CHANgE TO
D RETIREE WORK RESTRICTIONS
INCREASES ANNUAL HOUR LIMIT TO 1,200
As the law currently stands, public retirees are allowed to work for a governmental unit within Massachusetts on what is consid- ered to be a part-time basis. The law limits hours worked to 960 hours a year, as well as restricts earnings. The proposal passed in the House increases the hours to 1,500, while the Senate increases the limit to 1,200. Both versions leave the compensation limit as it is currently structured.
Superannuation retirees working in the private sector or in federal or other government work outside of Massachusetts are exempt from any restrictions in earnings or hours worked. Disability retirees are restricted in their earnings from any type of employment – public or private sector.
Since the two branches of the Legislature have passed slightly different versions of the hourly increase, a House/Senate Budget Conference Committee will sort out the difference during its delibera- tions in June. If passed in the final version of the FY19 Budget and signed into law by Governor Baker, the new hourly limit would likely go into effect as of January 1, 2019.
Under the current earnings limit,
“These restrictions date back many decades and were put in place
STATE LIFE INSURANCE IFNCREASE NO EASY TASK Budget Amendments Rejected
well exceed $5,000 and can easily surpass $10,000, even for modest arrangements.
JULY 2018
uring its debate on the FY19 to prevent public employees from State Budget, the Senate has retiring, receiving their pension and
voted to increase the hourly limit placed on retirees who return to part-time public service for a state or local entity in Massachusetts. Senators Michael Rodrigues (D- Westport) and Paul Feeney (D- Foxboro) cosponsored the measure as a floor amendment to the budget.
then returning to full-time work in the public sector within Massachu- setts. However, the law has always allowed retirees to return to public service on a part-time basis,” explains Association President Frank Valeri.
The Senate’s unanimous approval follows action taken by the House of Representatives in April, where a similar amendment was adopted within the House’s version of the Budget. Rep. Mark Cusack (D- Braintree) carried the Mass Retirees amendment, while Rep. Peter Durant (R-Spencer) filed a similar measure.
public retirees can earn the differ- ence between one’s pension and what their former job currently pays – plus an additional $15,000.
“In recent years, we’ve witnessed a greater number of retirees return- ing to part-time work. With people living longer, retirees want to remain involved and also make some extra money to help make ends meet. The current hourly restriction amounts to less than 18.5 hours per week. At 1,200 the average work week is roughly 23 hours, which meets the part-time standard.”
or more than a decade, Mass $5,000 benefit was established in Retirees has fought for an 1985. After 33 years, the benefit no
While the concept of increasing the benefit has been received favor- ably by the Group Insurance Com- mission and legislative leaders, the challenge remains securing the $9 million in new funding. Mass Retirees nearly passed the increase back in 2005, only to have had it blocked by former Governor Mitt
increase in the state’s basic life insurance benefit for retirees and active employees. Our goal is to increase the benefit to $10,000.
longer satisfies its original intent – to cover retirees’ funeral and burial expenses. According to the National Association of Funeral Directors, costs in Massachusetts
As members know, the current
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Please See Page 9 ☞
SEN. MICHAEL RODRIGUES (D-Westport)
REP. MARK CUSACK (D-Braintree)
SEN. PAUL FEENEY (D-Foxboro)
REP. PETER DURANT (R-Spencer)


































































































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