Your Retirement

Articles about Your Retirement that may be useful to Massachusetts retirees.

50 Years as the Voice of the Retired Public Employee

Founded in the fall of 1968, Mass Retirees has served as the lead advocates for all Massachusetts retired public employees for the past 50 years. 

From the Association’s humble beginnings, our mission has been to represent the interests of all public retirees at the state, local and federal levels of government. Our focus is public pension, Social Security, Medicare and retiree healthcare policy, for which Mass Retirees has become widely recognized for our expertise.

Preview of the January 2022 Voice

Preview of the January 2022 Voice
DECEMBER 10, 2021: As promised, for this week’s video I am joined by Bill Rehrey and Nancy McGovern for a sneak preview of our January 2022 edition of The Voice.
Before I dive into the details of what you will find in the upcoming newsletter, I’d like to thank the thousands of members who have promptly renewed your Mass Retirees membership for 2022. November began our membership renewal process for next year, with notices mailed to the 20,000+ members who renew at the end of the year. Members receive a renewal notice base

Mass. lawmakers relax decades-old rule to allow public retirees to work more while getting pensions

Mass. lawmakers relax decades-old rule to allow public retirees to work more while getting pensions

By Matt Stout, Globe Staff

Massachusetts legislators in recent weeks have loosened 40-year-old limits on how many hours government retirees can work for a public agency each year while still collecting their taxpayer-funded pension, realizing a change long sought by former employees but derided by critics as too generous.

Work progresses on Beacon Hill

Work progresses on Beacon Hill

October 1, 2021 Weekly Update: By Chief Executive Officer Shawn Duhamel

Before my brief hiatus in August, I reported to you that we anticipated a very busy fall. I’m happy to say that not only were we correct, but that things have been even busier than we would have thought. 

Benefit Check Delays Continue To Frustrate New Retirees

Benefit Check Delays Continue To Frustrate New Retirees

September 28, 2021: The "number-one problem" that Mass Retirees President Frank Valeri hears from his members is that it takes too long for newly retired public employees to collect their first monthly benefit check. Warning that the sizable gaps between a retirement date and a payment date put undue financial strain on workers at the end of their careers, Valeri urged lawmakers Tuesday to adopt reforms that guarantee delivery of at least partial checks by the due date. "These are the things that bother me," Valeri told the Public Service Committee.

President's Message: Share the Success!

September 2021 VoiceThere is no question that the tremendous investment success of the Commonwealth and local retirement systems should be celebrated. When modern pension funding schedules were implemented in the mid-1980s, no one could have envisioned the high level of asset gains that would come to fruition over the ensuing 36 years. 

AGGRESSIVE FUNDING & PROPER INVESTMENT MEET GOALS

September 2021 Voice: When the proper funding of our 104 public retirement systems began in 1985, the majority of Massachusetts systems were woefully underfunded. Back then the Commonwealth was the 2nd worst unfunded system in the country – second only to West Virginia! 

Weekly Update: Latest Retirement News

Weekly Update: Latest Retirement News

By Shawn Duhamel, Chief Executive Officer

A special town hall meeting Friday, 6/25

A special town hall meeting Friday, 6/25

June 18, 2021 - Weekly News Update: A big benefit of holding Tele-Town Hall meetings is that they enhance our ability to bring important guest speakers to our members on a regular basis. 

Senate Passes Post-Retirement Work Waiver Extension

Senate Passes Post-Retirement Work Waiver Extension

June 10, 2021-Thursday the Senate passed the Post-Retirement Work Waiver Extension amendment as part of legislation that addressed policies related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The current waiver was set to expire when the Governor’s state of emergency order expired on June 15th